Temple C

History of Construction and Use

Temple C and its precinct are located slightly to the northwest of the forum and the West Forum temples, on the road to Sikyon. Although the archaeological remains are not well preserved, the building was a Doric tetrastyle prostyle temple. Standing on a three-step krepidoma, rather than the typical Roman podium, Temple C measured roughly 11.3 X 19 m on the stylobate and was considerably larger than the other West Forum temples.

Restored plan of Temple C in Corinth, A.D. 150 Figure 1. Restored plan of Temple C in Corinth, A.D. 150

A Doric portico surrounded Temple C on the south, west and north. Principle access to the precinct was from the east where a Doric porch faced the road to Sikyon. There was also a rear entry from the west portico to the Glauke fountain house which it backed on to. Temple C and its surrounding portico do not share the same alignment. Temple C was probably constructed in the late Augustan period with the portico and porch built later. It is not known to which deity the temple was dedicated.

Restored plan of Temple C in Corinth, A.D. 150 Figure 2. Restored plan of Temple C in Corinth, A.D. 150

Testimonia

Pausanias 2.2.6-8
Suetonius, Life of Vespasian 17
Plutarch, De Anima, fragment 7, no 11.

Bibliography

Scranton, R. Corinth I, iii, Monuments in the Lower Agora and North of the Archaic Temple. Princeton, 1951.
Stillwell, R. Corinth I, ii, Architecture. Cambridge, 1941, 131-165.
Williams, C.K. II. “Corinth 1974: Forum Southwest,” Hesperia 44 (1975) 1-50.
Williams, C.K. II. “Corinth 1983: The Route to Sikyon,” Hesperia 53 (1984) 83-122.
Williams, C.K. II. “A Re-Evaluation of Temple E and the West end of the forum in Corinth,” in The Greek Renaissance in the Roman Empire (Institute of Classical Studies Bulletin Supplement 55), eds. Walker and Averil, 1989, 156-162, plates 60-62.
Williams, C.K. II. “Excavations at Corinth, 1989: The Temenos of Temple E,” Hesperia 59 (1990) 325-369.
Williams, C.K. II. “A Re-founding of Corinth: Some Roman Religious Attitudes,” in Roman Architecture in the Greek World. eds. Macready and Thompson. London, 1987, 26-37.